How Could Mom Do It? A Lesson In Grace

How often do you watch someone’s child misbehave in public and think, “Mom or dad would never put up with that!” We watch court cases or read the news and see parents defend children for crimes and think, “That parent must know they are guilty!”

I remember a few occasions (maybe more than a few), times where something got back to my parents. They always began with the phrase, “I was talking to…and they mentioned something I’d like to ask you about.” I knew at that moment; I – was – BUSTED!

A young man was tired of the monotony and restrictions of home decided to leave, to go where he could do what he wanted. He had had enough and let fly with his thoughts and opinions to his mom and left home.

After a number of years of doing what he wanted, when he wanted and how he wanted, things had not turned out as he planned. He decided to write to his mother and tell her that he was going to take the bus back home. He told her that if she would like to see him, she should hang a white handkerchief on top of the tree in their yard which could easily be seen before the bus stopped at the little home-town station. As the young man neared his house, everyone began to move to one side of the bus and began pointing out the window. There, the tree was covered in white handkerchiefs, enough so that the tree appeared covered in snow.

The son could not understand after all he had said and done that his mother would be willing to take him back into her home and her life. How could she do it?

In a disposable world we simply toss out the DVD player or the toaster, never taking time to repair it because it is cheaper to replace it. Then, when someone mis-communicates or misunderstands an e-mail, a phrase, or a raised eye-brow, we get hurt. A relationship breaks because we fail to read between the lines and so we dispose of it or toss it aside.

When the crisis is not fixed in the same time frame as our favorite movie, it seems so easy to toy with the thought of tossing aside a relationship that does not work to our design or advantage. We assume that because we feel a certain way, the other party must feel the same way.

It was a mystery to me as a child just as it was a mystery to the young man. It remains a mystery to me even as a parent, that my love for my children can increase in difficulties, yet, I find it does.

A similar mystery exists with God when his love increases even when we wander. Know this “…where sin increased, God's grace increased much more (Romans 5:20).” How could mom do it? She knew grace. So can you.

3 comments:

K. Langston said...

I loved this blog, Ken. Please keep writing and sharing.

How often has my own son, when still a toddler, misbehaved in public because of autism? I remember the critical stares from other people who didn't realize what he was struggling with inside his little body.

So often, we make a judgment based on a little glimpse of the picture. I know I do. I am asking God to show me how to love as He does. It's not easy, and I so often fail! But ultimately, I do believe that this is the reason we are here.

I appreciate what you write! I will be checking back in!

Ken L. Hagler said...

Kelly,

Thanks for the comments. The experiences we as parents have with autism & aspergers certainly add to this don't they?

Thank you for the encouraging words. I will be doing a piece in August about a local non-profit for autism and I'm looking forward to that opportunity.

Ken L. Hagler said...

Kelly,

Thanks for the comments. The experiences we as parents have with autism & aspergers certainly add to this don't they?

Thank you for the encouraging words. I will be doing a piece in August about a local non-profit for autism and I'm looking forward to that opportunity.

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